Collections : [Historic Geneva]

Historic Geneva

Historic Geneva

Geneva History Museum
543 South Main Street
Geneva, NY 14456, United States
The Archives consists of the two-dimensional paper portion of our collection. We have 1,300 cubic feet of archives material, which includes 50,000 images. Geneva’s stories are captured in letters, diaries, ledgers and minute books, and photographs. Inventory of our material is ongoing, please contact us or visit our website for further information.

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Collection
Geneva Historical Society
This file includes a fairly complete list of surnames and subjects in our archives. It is subject to change and there is no guarantee the boxes have more than a folder of information. The collections with available finding aids are identified.
Collection
Clark, Lawrence (1845-1926) Whiteleather, Margie Smith, Louise Clark
The papers in the Clark Collection have had different donors at different times. Photographs and some papers were given by Louise Clark Smith 31 October 1998 and history with photographs. Her daughter, Margie Whiteleather, 13 January 2006 gave more items to add to the collection. This includes the information regarding Cahgnauga Camp in the Adirondacks. This camp was in existence from 1849-1911. The list of members is included. The earliest items do not appear to have documentation regarding their provenance
Collection
De Lancey, William Heathcote (1897-1961)
These papers appear to have been given to the Geneva Historical Society upon the death of William Heathcote DeLancey in 1961.
Collection
Brooks, Anna Broshard, Mrs. John (Phelps, NY)

Beginning in England with the early childhood of Brooks in these papers cover his settlement in the United States and his subsequent profession as an astronomer. His move from Phelps to Geneva at the behest of William Smith followed by the professorship at Hobart and William Smith Colleges affords further insight into the career of a late 19th early 20th centuries discoverer of comets.