The Viacheslav Grigor'evich Naumenko Papers, 1949 - 1961

Descriptive Identification

Repository
Foundation of Russian History,
1407 Robinson Road
Jordanville, NY 13361
Extent
0.5 cubic feet (1 manuscript box)
Creator
Naumenko, Vi︠a︡cheslav Grigorʹevich, 1883-
Language
Russian
Abstract
This collection contains the correspondence of Viacheslave Grigor’evich Naumenko, pertaining to the forced repatriation of the Cossacks from Lienz, Austria during Operation Keelhaul.

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Administrative Information

Access Restriction

This collection is open for research according to the regulations of the Foundation of Russian History.

Use Restriction

Permission to quote (publish) from unpublished or previously published material must be obtained as described in the regulations of the Foundation of Russian History.

Biographical/Historical Commentary

Viacheslav Grigor'evich Naumenko was born in Petrovskaia, Kuban Oblast in 1883. In 1901 he graduated from the Mikhailovskii Kadetskii Korpus in Voronezh, and in 1903 he completed the Nikolaevskii Cavalry School in Saint Petersburg. He saw action with Kuban Cossack forces during the First World War in Galicia, and later during the Russian Revolution where he participated in the First Kuban Campaign. in 1919 Naumenko was elected Ataman of the Kuban Cossacks, and in 1920 he evacuated the Crimean Peninsula with his forces, heading first to the island of Lemnos and finally settling in Serbia. In 1944 Naumenko evacuated to Northern Italy with fellow Cossacks, and after the war he was resettled in the Bavarian city of Kempten. In 1949 he immigrated to the United States. Naumenko died in Valley Cottage, New York in 1979.

Scope and Content

This collection contains the correspondence of General Viacheslav Grigor’evich Naumenko, a commander of Cossack forces during the First World War, the Russian Civil War, and the Second World War. The bulk of this collection pertains to Operation Keelhaul and the forced repatriation of Cossacks at Lienz, Austria in 1945.

Efforts were made during processing to retain the original order of the collection. The correspondence was arranged by the country of residence of the correspondent, as is reflected in the following finding aid. The correspondence pertaining to the events the transpired at Lienz was organized alphabetically by correspondent in two folders, labelled 2 and 3; the first folder was not in this collection of documents.