The Archimandrite Polikarp (Gorbunov) Papers, 1917 - 1958

Descriptive Identification

Repository
Foundation of Russian History,
1407 Robinson Road
Jordanville, NY 13361
Extent
.16 cubic feet (1 oversize box)
Creator
Polikarp, Archimandrite (Gorbunov), 1880-1970.
Language
RussianChinese
Abstract
These papers contain the personal papers of Archimandrite Polikarp (Gorbunov). After the Russian Revolution, Archimandrite Polikarp found himself in Harbin, China, where he was closely associated with Metropolitan Meletii (Zaborovskii), and was assigned as rector of the Annunciation cathedral.

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Administrative Information

Access Restriction

This collection is open for research according to the regulations of the Foundation of Russian History.

Use Restriction

Permission to quote (publish) from unpublished or previously published material must be obtained as described in the regulations of the Foundation of Russian History.

Biographical/Historical Commentary

Pavel Gorbunov was born in Shingali, Kazanskaia guberniia, Russia in 1880. In 1899, Gorbunov became a novice at a monastery in the diocese of Kazan. In 1908, Gorbunov entered a monastery in Tomsk, where in 1910 he was tonsured a monk by Archbishop Meletii (Zaborovskii), taking the name Polikarp. In 1920 he emigrated to Harbin, Manchuria where he served at the Annunciation cathedral. He was elevated to the rank of igumen in 1927, and to the rank of archimandrite in 1932. He died in Jordanville, New York in 1970.

Scope and Content

These papers contain the personal papers of Archimandrite Polikarp (Gorbunov). After the Russian Revolution, Archimandrite Polikarp found himself in Harbin, China, where he was closely associated with Metropolitan Meletii (Zaborovskii), and was assigned as rector of the Annunciation cathedral. After fleeing from Harbin, Archimandrite Polikarp relocated to Hong Kong, and finally emigrated to the U.S.A., where he entered Holy Trinity Monastery in Jordanville, N.Y. The Subject file includes an inventory of ecclesiastical items of the Harbin Annunciation cathedral.

Detailed processing and preservation microfilming for these materials were made possible by a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and by matching funds from the Hoover Institution and the Holy Trinity Seminary. The grant also provides depositing a microfilm copy in the Hoover Institution Archives. The original materials remain in the Holy Trinity Seminary Archives as its property. A transfer table indicating corresponding box and reel numbers is appended to this register. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these materials do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.