The Vladislav Al’bionovich Maevskii Papers, 1869 - 1978

Descriptive Identification

Repository
Foundation of Russian History,
1407 Robinson Road
Jordanville, NY 13361
Extent
23 cubic feet (50 manuscript boxes, 4 oversize boxes)
Creator
Maevskii, Vladislav Al'bionovich
Language
EnglishGreek, Modern (1453- )RussianPolishSerbian
Abstract
These papers reflect the writings and research interests of Vladislav Al’bionovich Maevskii, church historian and theologian. Among his writings are works relating to late 19th and early 20th century history of the Eastern Orthodox Church, especially relating to Russian Orthodoxy, Mount Athos, and the Orthodox Church in the United States.

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Administrative Information

Access Restriction

This collection is open for research according to the regulations of the Foundation of Russian History.

Use Restriction

Permission to quote (publish) from unpublished or previously published material must be obtained as described in the regulations of the Foundation of Russian History.

Biographical/Historical Commentary

Vladislav Al’bionovich Maevskii was born in Kremenchug, Russia in 1893. In 1919 he served as a Staff Captain in the White Army, and in 1920 he was evacuated from Odessa. In 1931, Maevskii graduated from the Theological Faculty of the University of Belgrade, later working as secretary to Patriarch Varnava (Rosich). Maevskii emigrated to the United States in 1945, where he was a professor at Saint Tikhon’s Orthodox Theological Seminary in South Canaan, Pennsylvania. Maevskii died in 1975.

Scope and Content

These papers reflect the writings and research interests of Vladislav Al’bionovich Maevskii, church historian and theologian. Among his writings are works relating to late 19th and early 20th century history of the Eastern Orthodox Church, especially relating to Russian Orthodoxy, Mount Athos, and the Orthodox Church in the United States.

In emigration, Maevskii attended Belgrade University’s theological faculty, and served as secretary to Patriarch Varnava (Rosich), and librarian of the Patriarchal library. As a result, Maevskii’s scholarly activities included numerous topics relating to the Serbian Orthodox Church.

After arriving in the United States, Vladislav Maevskii became a member of the faculty of St. Tikhon’s Orthodox Theological Seminary in South Canaan, PA. This appointment allowed Maevskii to focus on the history as well as contemporary issues of the Orthodox Church in the United States.

The correspondence file represents Maevskii’s close contact with ecclesiastical figures, academicians, scholars, and representatives of the Russian émigré intelligentsia.

Maevskii’s speeches and writings focus largely on his major research interests, and include drafts, notes, and typescripts of both published and unpublished works. Aside from topics relating to Church history, included are works on Rasputin, Russian and Serbian relations, and general topics relating to Russian history and Orthodox theology.

The SUBJECT FILE includes materials on the history of the Russian Orthodox Church and especially on the various jurisdictional conflicts that affected the Church in emigration. Particularly important are documents dealing with conflicts of the Orthodox Church in the United States, reflected in collected correspondence of Church hierarchs of the Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of America, the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia, conciliar minutes, epistles, and other related documents. Of special significance is Maevskii’s research on the Athonite monks and monasteries.

Detailed processing and preservation microfilming for these materials were made possible by a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and by matching funds from the Hoover Institution and the Holy Trinity Seminary. The grant also provides depositing a microfilm copy in the Hoover Institution Archives. The original materials remain in the Holy Trinity Seminary Archives as its property. A transfer table indicating corresponding box and reel numbers is appended to this register. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these materials do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.